Onderhand zullen de meeste mensen wel weten dat SoF in British Columbia vergeleken werd met porno. Althans het kreeg een ratig gelijk aan die van een "adult movie". Eurogamer gaat er dieper op in en kijkt waarom dit gebeurde en wat men verder gaat doen.On July 11th the Canadian province of British Columbia took the unprecedented step of classifying "Soldier of Fortune" as an "adult motion picture", making it illegal to sell the game to under 18s, and forcing retailers to stock it seperately. The decision gave companies thirty days to contest the ruling.

On August 11th publisher Activision announced that they had mounted a legal challenge to the classification, claiming that the adult rating "undermines consumers' rights of freedom and choice of expression, and sets a precedent for government censorship".

Or does it?

British Columbia seems to realise that describing a computer game as an adult movie, and forcing retailers

to get a license to sell pornography to sell the game, is a bizarre situation. They are now working on

developing an entirely new classification system for games, which will allow them to enforce the age ratings rather than resorting to extreme measures like those applied to Soldier of Fortune.

In my opinion Activision should be helping British Columbia to enforce the existing age ratings which they claim to "firmly support", rather than trying to escalate the situation by accusing the province of

censorship.

Hé een Dutch Power Cow...

Censuur of niet, maar de regering heeft ook een maatschappelijke taak om burgers te beschermen. En waarschijnlijk is men er overtuigd van dat al het geweld van SoF niet goed is voor de tere kinderziel